Transition Zones

Posted by ki Oct 05th 10:22 PM

This section applies to the construction or expansion of three to eight residential units that are located on a platted residential lot

On site plan for 3-8 lots it requires a platted residential lot. In 1-2 it simply requires a legal lot. Both should require just a legal lot. Limiting to platted lots will reduce the usefulness of transition zones. Also lots without deed restrictions are frequently not platted.


Posted by ki Oct 06th 10:56 PM

MULTI-FAMILY. A residential building containing three or more dwelling units within a single building, with one or more multi-unit buildings per site, and includes, but is not limited to, triplex, quadplex, bungalow court apartments, and multi-unit apartment complexes.

If you are R4 and above you cannot do detached structures (3-4 separate adu type units).

In r4 you can only do duplex and multi-family. Multifamily is defined on page 278 as a building with 3 units or more.

So if your deed restrictions say you can only do single family structures you can do effectively nothing on these lots (with the exception of rebuilding a house). Unless you want to get sued and not get clear title.

Once you get to anything above rm1 (rm2, rm3 etc) you can’t do anything but triplexes.

The number of lots with deed restrictions that allow triplexes is effectively zero.

This restriction will greatly greatly decrease the unit yield from this code rewrite.


Posted by tannerblair Oct 05th 10:04 PM

Single-Family

It seems counter-intuitive that R3 would allow for a new single family home.


Posted by ki Oct 05th 10:44 PM

If the parking structure is less than 20 feet behind the building facade, the width of the parking structure may not exceed 50 percent of the width of the building facade, measured parallel to the front lot line

Allow one garage space in all cases. So the code would be “the greater of the width of 50 of the building facade or 12 feet”. This encourages small narrow houses. Also takes into account possibility of a tree limiting the width of the primary dwelling.


Posted by ki Oct 05th 10:20 PM

Cottage Court

Why are cottage courts not allowed in all rm zones? They are currently only allowed in rm1.

Posted by ki Oct 05th 10:32 PM

Cottage Court

Why are cottage courts not allowed in all rm zones? They are currently only allowed in rm1.


Posted by ki Oct 05th 10:29 PM

A pedestrian entrance must face and connect directly to the primary street, or for corner lots, to the primary or side street.

Make it clear that one pedestrian entrance must face and connect to the primary street. Obviously in a multiunit develop (with multiple buildings it would not make sense or be practical to require every pedestrian entrance to face the street.


Posted by agh Oct 05th 10:38 PM

Compatibility Height Stepback Distance from the lot line of the triggering property

Compatibility impact should be limited to only within 25’ of a lot line and only to 45’. The current writing of this will limit height and create ziggurat buildings across the city.


Posted by agh Oct 05th 10:40 PM

Table 23-3C-5040(A) Parking Requirements for Mixed-Use Zones

There should be no parking required for any residential. The cost and impact to impervious cover is too high.


Posted by agh Oct 05th 10:50 PM

Page 379 - 1

There doesn’t seem to be enough differentiation between MU1 and MU2 to warrant to different zones.


Posted by agh Oct 05th 10:54 PM

(2) Compatibility Setback

Compatibility Setbacks should be removed


Posted by agh Oct 05th 10:58 PM

Page 396 - 1

Minimum areas for lots should be reduced and compatibility setbacks should be removed.


Posted by agh Oct 05th 10:01 PM

(2) Compatibility Height Stepback Distance from the lot line of the triggering property:

It seems a bit silly that a zone could be potential lower than what is allowed next to it, i.e. a single-family home could be taller than a main-street building. The reduction should only be to 35’ if there is any reduction at all.


Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:03 PM

) A development application on property zoned R2A, R2B, R2C, or R3 may count keystone trees towards tree planting or mitigation requirements.

We need to be working to maximize the value, effectiveness of our new transition zones to help deliver as many missing middle units as we can to address affordability, sustainability and equity issues, so prioritizing or helping smaller scaled zones, which have much more flexibility to squeeze in the lower units over the transition-zoned categories undercuts the stated AHBP and council direction goals.

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:59 PM

(4) The tree prevents reasonable use of the property; or

In regards to protected trees, how to we balance our desire to get more affordable and market affordable missing middle units in the new R4/RM1 zones vs. preserving a tree that negatively impacts building placement/unit yield on a lot?

Is it reasonable for a protected tree to keep a transit accesible, high opportunity lot from delivering 10 units, when say it could only fit 4?

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:55 PM

(4) Removal of the tree cannot be avoided through minor changes to a development, such as grading, access, parking, or landscape island configuration, that would not change building layout or number of units; or

Does this mean that “keystone trees” will be approved for removal/impact if their placement is on the site where a building will be going?

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:53 PM

(B) An application proposing to remove or impact a keystone tree associated with a development application is not required if the property is zoned R2A, R2B, R2C, or R3. (C) A development application on property zoned R2A, R2B, R2C, or R3 may count keystone trees towards tree planting or mitigation requirements.

Why carve out residential house scaled zones up to R3 from enforcement of new smaller tree regs and not exempt small-scaled missing middle which we want to help get built in R4 and RM1? By adding this new regulation on the small residential lots in transition zones where we want to see missing middle units built, this increases the complexity, cost and feasibility, making the units harder to fit into these old established lots and, even where they can be, will result in more expensive, more complex to design and build structures that directly increase the rent/price of those units.