Trees

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:35 PM

d. Pruning more than 25% of the live canopy.

Helpful definition, details provide useful clarity and improvement on current “excessive pruning.”

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:34 PM

c. Damaging the critical root zone; and

Any part of the CRZ? On referring to same impacts as current code (ie, no lower than 4-inches in 12 CRZ, no more than half of CRZ outside of 12 radius)

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:33 PM

Small Public Tree. A public tree that has a DBH of at least 4 inches or a planted public tree of any diameter.

Invasive trees and scrub trees that are in the public right of way, sidewalk easement, are now given protected status and add time, cost and complexity of full arborist review?

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:31 PM

Public Tree. A tree that has at least two thirds of its trunk diameter located on real property owned or controlled by the city.

Another new term and type of regulated tree?

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:29 PM

Keystone Tree. A tree that has a DBH of at least 8 inches, but less than 19 inches.

This is a new category. Was it necessary to add another category of tree? Were the old regulations not resulting in desired results?


Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:37 PM

The director shall adopt administrative rules to implement this article. In consultation with the Transportation and Public Works directors, the director shall adopt administrative rules to implement the street tree regulations in Article 23-8E (Street Tree Requirements).

Draft administrative rules? Timeline? Effects? Any different than what we have now administratively, and if so what are the added goals?


Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:41 PM

(B) The review and inspection fees may be waived if the application is for:

“MAY” be waived—meaning staff has discretion, or it will be waived if below conditions are met?

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:39 PM

The city arborist shall review all applications to remove or impact a regulated tree for compliance with this article.

Based on the above definition of “regulated tree” the process scope is being enlarged significantly. Do we know or have any idea on how many additional trees/decision/inspection points we are talking about adding the small public trees and “keystone” trees to this process?


Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:36 PM

(1) Remove or impact a regulated tree without obtaining the city arborist’s review and approval under this article; or

Regulated tree by this definition now includes “keystone trees” which are any trees over 8-inch diameter, so now to remove any tree over 8-inches in diameter I have to go through arborist application/review? How much would this process cost to remove an invasive chinaberry or scrub hackberry tree that happens to be over 8 inches in diameter?

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:32 PM

(A) The city arborist may request that a city department administratively modify a policy, rule, or design standard to the extent necessary to preserve a regulated tree if enforcement will otherwise result in removal or removal by impact. (B) At the city arborist’s request, a responsible director may administratively modify the applicable policy, rule, or design standard if the director determines that a waiver or modification will not pose a threat to public safety.

The applicant/owner can’t request a modification to preserve a tree? What would be an example of allowing a modification that would be a threat to public safety? Would allowing a building to start before the front setback line, or extend into a side street setback (for example) to fit in the units and save a tree/trees be something that was considered safe enough to be allowed. Would there be criteria/standard modification options to attempt to save trees (ie, additional height, FAR, encroaching into setbacks, waiving of compatibility) that could make the process far less opaque and give property owners visibility and flexibility of knowing what options might ever be allowed, and what wouldn’t.


Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:03 PM

) A development application on property zoned R2A, R2B, R2C, or R3 may count keystone trees towards tree planting or mitigation requirements.

We need to be working to maximize the value, effectiveness of our new transition zones to help deliver as many missing middle units as we can to address affordability, sustainability and equity issues, so prioritizing or helping smaller scaled zones, which have much more flexibility to squeeze in the lower units over the transition-zoned categories undercuts the stated AHBP and council direction goals.

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:59 PM

(4) The tree prevents reasonable use of the property; or

In regards to protected trees, how to we balance our desire to get more affordable and market affordable missing middle units in the new R4/RM1 zones vs. preserving a tree that negatively impacts building placement/unit yield on a lot?

Is it reasonable for a protected tree to keep a transit accesible, high opportunity lot from delivering 10 units, when say it could only fit 4?

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:55 PM

(4) Removal of the tree cannot be avoided through minor changes to a development, such as grading, access, parking, or landscape island configuration, that would not change building layout or number of units; or

Does this mean that “keystone trees” will be approved for removal/impact if their placement is on the site where a building will be going?

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:53 PM

(B) An application proposing to remove or impact a keystone tree associated with a development application is not required if the property is zoned R2A, R2B, R2C, or R3. (C) A development application on property zoned R2A, R2B, R2C, or R3 may count keystone trees towards tree planting or mitigation requirements.

Why carve out residential house scaled zones up to R3 from enforcement of new smaller tree regs and not exempt small-scaled missing middle which we want to help get built in R4 and RM1? By adding this new regulation on the small residential lots in transition zones where we want to see missing middle units built, this increases the complexity, cost and feasibility, making the units harder to fit into these old established lots and, even where they can be, will result in more expensive, more complex to design and build structures that directly increase the rent/price of those units.

Posted by atalbert Oct 05th 10:48 PM

23-4C-2030 Keystone Trees

The creation of another protected tree category further complicates development process, and by adding trees 8-inches or larger to have to go through the arborist review process and not just requiring mitigation for removing one during planning process, adds another layer of complexity and cost for both city and owners.